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Markova stacks, part 2:
A quick guide to the stacking patterns

Summary: 6 natural patterns of human intelligence strongly influence how you and your clients process sensory information, think, learn, and communicate. Index to article.

Many of what most people consider "character traits" or "innate talents" seem to result from the 6 patterns of information processing we call Markova stacks. Below we list some general patterns. 1 

AVK: great communicator 2 

  • Speaks logically; likes to discuss ideas
  • Connects best by talking
  • Organizes by talking about what needs to get done
  • Learns easily via discussion, lecture
  • May interrupt others, monopolize conversations
  • Likes to help others understand
  • Can attend details and "big picture" simultaneously
  • May have sketchy sense of own body, move awkwardly, find physical activities frustrating
  • Shy about touch; private about feelings

AKV: natural leader

  • Speaks with feeling and rhythm; likes to tell others what to do
  • Connects best by talking
  • Organizes by talking about what needs to get done
  • May interrupt others, have difficulty listening
  • Physically energetic; good coach
  • Sees the whole of things; may be inventor or systems thinker
  • May have problems with reading, writing, spelling
  • "Eye shy"; cannot maintain eye contact
  • Visionary; wants to inspire others

KAV: competent doer

  • Acts logically; likes working with hands
  • Connects best by doing, touching
  • Organizes in piles
  • Learns easily by doing or discussion
  • Can articulate emotions and body sensations
  • Good at storytelling, teaching movement and activities
  • Sees the whole of things
  • May have problems with reading, writing
  • "Eye shy"; cannot maintain eye contact

KVA: perpetual student

  • Acts logically; likes to do things
  • Connects best by doing, touching
  • Organizes in piles
  • Learns easily by doing and watching
  • Many diverse interests (like drawing and scuba diving)
  • Can attend details and "big picture" simultaneously; sees pictures in 3-D, from many perspectives
  • Difficulty expressing feelings in words
  • Speech may have long pauses, go in circles; asks lots of questions; may have difficulty verbalizing abstractions
  • Rarely speaks in groups
  • Sensitive to voice tone

VAK: show and tell

  • Writes logically; shows and illustrates ideas
  • Connects best by eye contact
  • Organizes in lists
  • Learns easily by reading, then discussing or teaching
  • Loves visual details and possibilities; reads everything
  • Persuasive speaker; likes to teach, explain, tell stories
  • Talks out loud to sort ideas and make decisions
  • May have sketchy sense of own body, move awkwardly, find physical activities frustrating
  • Shy about touch; private about feelings

VKA: great collaborator

  • Writes logically; may like to draw and design
  • Connects best by eye contact
  • Visually meticulous; organizes in lists
  • Learns easily by reading or watching, then doing
  • Learns sports easily; likes competitive sports
  • May get others' feelings confused with own
  • Talkative one-on-one; uncomfortable speaking in groups; asks lots of questions
  • May have trouble listening to prolonged, fast, or abstract speech
  • Sensitive to voice tone

Patterns of genius

Often people display genius in their unconscious modality. So although people with K unconscious tend to be unathletic, shy about touch, and private about or out of touch with their emotions, top gymnasts are almost all K unconscious (usually VAK). 3  And some K unconscious people are very snuggly and sensual, very in touch with their own and others' feelings, or both.

People with a visual unconscious often have good mechanical skills (which require visualization), and may be visionaries. Those with an auditory unconscious can often track very complex multi-threaded patterns (stories, conversations, computer programming, schedules), and are often write well.

The very same processing patters that cause a person difficulties, and that may make communication with them problematic, are often the fountainhead of their genius.

Part 3: Patterns for communication and learning > >


— Jan "yon" Saeger and W. Keppel
© 2004, some rights reserved
posted July 2004
Creative Commons License

Notes

  1. Adapted from Dawna Markova. (1996) The Open Mind: Exploring the 6 Patterns of Natural Intelligence. Berkeley, California: Conari Press. ISBN: 1-57324-064-8. Out of print; buy used at Amazon. Jump back
  2. For each pattern, we list the sensory modality used for conscious processing first, then the subconscious modality, and finally the unconscious modality. AVK = auditory conscious, visual subconscious, kinesthetic unconscious. Jump back
  3. Personal communication from Dr. Michael Harris, who coaches gymnasts using NLP and hypnosis. Contact him at DrMichaelHarris.com. Jump back

Jan Saeger and W. Keppel are NLP Master Practitioners, NLP Health Practitioners, and NLP developers.


URL: easychangeworks.com/articles-nlp/markova-2-guide.htm

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